A Lightweight jQuery Notification Bar

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Notifying users with quick messages and alerts in a website is one of the most recurring needs of a web developer.
Every time I need to implement something like that, I start looking around the web hoping to find some Javascript/jQuery plugin that would do the work for me.
The good thing is that a lot of people have already faced this problem.
The bad thing is that the results of the search are way too many and often very confusing.
Chances are that most of the time, you don’t really need a 3MB-super-fancy-hyper-customizable-highly-priced plugin, but you just want something that works, and that you can quickly incorporate into your code.

Where my docs at? (A smattering of pointers on AngularJS, one of which at least is difficult if not impossible to find on the Internet)

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AngularJS is a young framework, still so downy-soft that much of the advice you’ll find on support forums refers to an earlier and almost completely incompatible minor version.

So long as you don’t hit a blind spot in the documentation or the community support, it’s a great framework for rapid development, but as soon as you try to do something that isn’t public knowledge, you’ll be scratching your head for hours.

How to deploy your web app to Amazon EC2 using Capistrano

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What is Capistrano?

Capistrano is an open source tool mainly used to deploy web applications from source code management (SCM) to one or more servers. The aim of this guide is showing how to easily deploy your app to amazon EC2 using Capistrano. We can leverage its multi-stage extension to provide a different deployment strategy in different scenarios.

ExtJS 4: Ext.Ajax and Timeout

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I was introduced to ExtJS a few months ago because I worked on a project that was heavily using the ExtJS 4 framework. Like many other frameworks, ExtJS had some really cool features, but also a few headaches. One headache I ran into was using the Ext.Ajax class to make a simple Ajax request. The Ext.Ajax class provides your basic event handling functionality for a successful/failed request. This class provides a timeout property that will execute an abort request when a certain amount of time has passed. However, I found that when a timeout does execute, a javascript error occurs. In Firebug, the error states:

Lessons Learned from My First HTML5 Video implementation

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I recently had the opportunity to implement an HTML5 video for a client.  It was the first time I’d really worked with HTML5 video, and I ran into a few issues and quirks I thought I’d share for other developers who run into these issues.

 

1. HTML5 video with a fallback to Flash works really well.  The opposite doesn’t work as well. 

 

At first I started implementing my video in Flash with a fallback to HTML5 – not for any special reason, but only because a previous developer had implemented another of the client’s videos that way and I followed the pattern already set.  I soon discovered that although this works fine for a video that just plays in a fairly static page, it wasn’t ideal for the kind of video I was implementing, which required some custom controls and interactions with other elements on the page.  I first thought that the best way to handle this would be with a try / catch, but since my flash took a little bit of time to load, I would often get an exception when calling a flash function, even though the flash was ultimately playable.  The real crux of the problem was that in an HTML5 to Flash fallback implementation, the flash code doesn’t even exist as far as the browser is concerned unless HTML5 is not supported – in which case the <video> tags don’t exist.  The user can only ever interact with the HTML5 video or with the Flash – never with both.  If you implement it the opposite way, BOTH Flash and HTML5 video exist on the page, potentially leading to a situation where the user is interacting with both videos.  Once I found myself writing code to catch and prevent these weird interactions, I decided this was the wrong way to go.   The HTML5 to Flash fallback is the way this code is meant to be implemented, and leads to the cleanest implementation.

How a LAMP developer learned to stop worrying and love Ruby on Rails

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One of the most raging debates within the web developer community is LAMP vs. Ruby on Rails (RoR), with countless posts all over the Internet that debate the merits of one versus the other… but this blog entry isn’t going to be one of them.  You see, I’m new to RoR and hesitate to call myself an LAMP expert. So I’ll just discuss my own experience going from working on PHP-based sites to working on RoR-based sites.

Goodbye Flash world? Hello SVG world?

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In the end, it’s probably Steve Jobs’ fault.

Back in April 2010, when Jobs explained why the iEmpire line wouldn’t be supporting Flash, a subset of the developer community was anticipating HTML5 as giddily as a Twilight sequel, but the majority were only marginally aware of its existence. The first preview version of IE9 had just been released. Firefox had advanced support for many HTML5 elements, but only those early-adopting developers were really paying attention.