Grio and Angular 2: Are They Ready for Each Other?

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At Grio, we love Angular.  By my estimation we currently use it for at least half of our front-end web application code.  And I in particular have affection for it, so I greeted the recent release of Angular2 with some interest and trepidation.

The release was just an event, though. The framework had already been around long enough for me to fret about it for some time.

Meteor

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For the past year, I’ve been working mainly with AngularJS and before that Ruby on Rails. I’ve never heard of Meteor until a few weeks ago. I am intrigued by the idea of tightly connecting the client and server together in a synergistic manner that allows for fast responsiveness, which is what Meteor is all about. I decided to go through Meteor’s tutorial online and get a feel for why the framework differentiates itself from other current technologies. From a very high level perspective, Meteor is a very good solution for quickly building an application from the ground up and provides some cool features out of the box.

Frontend Resolutions for 2015

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It is a new year and I can exploit that to write a post proclaiming how
something ought to be done in 2015. We can use the new year to discard last year’s practices and mistakes as “the old way” and start fresh from lessons that we’ve learned.

The interesting (and also most frustrating) part about building frontend apps is
how fast the landscape changes. The tools, libraries, and frameworks that you
use today might not be the same as what you’d end up using on a new project only
a month from now. While we’ve ended up with this culture of adopting something
new as soon as someone posts that the “old” way is “dead”, I’ve found a few
pieces of the frontend stack that I do not plan on switching out anytime soon.

I would also like to preface this with stating that this post is highly
opinionated. The opinions expressed here are mine and formed through my own
experiences. These opinions may not reflect what I end up doing in practice, nor
does it reflect on what others at Grio may choose or use.

Server-side pagination with AngularJS

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AngularJS is one of the most used Javascript frameworks nowadays.

A characteristic of this framework is the possibility of binding input or output parts of an HTML page to a model represented by standard JavaScript variables.

Looping through arrays and collections is made easy by the ngRepeat directive.
This directive becomes handy when dealing with lists and tables, especially if associated to the AngularJS filters, which allow you to handle pagination, filtering and sorting by adding just one line of code to your html.

Unfortunately, one of the limitations of this approach is that the filtering is done client-side, therefore it wouldn’t be an optimal solution when dealing with a substantial number of rows/records.