Release Practices at Grio

by

In a previous blog post, I covered the “textbook” definition of continuous integration, along with a handful of tools and practices that fulfill or help to fulfill said definition. These tools and practices include breaking up your app into components (e.g. front-end and back-end, or, for much larger projects, using microservices), utilizing “watch” utilities locally to iteratively run tests, and choosing test-oriented frameworks (e.g. Rails, Django, Grails, etc.). However, I didn’t talk much about any specific continuous integration setup, nor some of the third-party services that go together to make an efficient release process. I also didn’t talk much about how continuous integration fits into the larger cycle of deployment and release management. I aim to cover some of those topics here, and fill in the larger picture of how CI helps to ensure code quality and stability in a software project.

Bundler Bulkheads for Rails on Docker

by

As part of my exploration of a minimum set of devops tools, I’ve been learning how to stack containers full of Rails apps onto the Docker. There are plenty of examples of how to get started with Rails and Postgres on Docker, even one from the whale’s mouth, as it were. Working from this example, it was pretty clear to me that one of Docker’s major strengths is that it makes it really, really easy to get something running with a minimum of fuss; it took all of about a half day to learn enough Docker to hoist anchor, and even tweak a few things to my liking. One thing kept nagging me about the Docker example, though, and that was a warning from bundler when running docker-compose.

Continuous Integration: An Overview

by

Continuous Integration at Grio

In the same way that testing code is more and more becoming table stakes for modern software projects, continuous integration is increasingly becoming standard on projects of any non-trivial degree of complexity. Here at Grio, we leverage continuous integration whenever possible, in order to eliminate time spent performing routine deployments and tracking down integration issues.

How to deploy your web app to Amazon EC2 using Capistrano

by

What is Capistrano?

Capistrano is an open source tool mainly used to deploy web applications from source code management (SCM) to one or more servers. The aim of this guide is showing how to easily deploy your app to amazon EC2 using Capistrano. We can leverage its multi-stage extension to provide a different deployment strategy in different scenarios.