Internet Cryptography Demystified

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About cryptography

While going through a set of configurations to connect on a remote machine I was asked to upload my public key and I realized that I didn’t really know what that was for. If you are asking yourself the same question, or need to convince your mom she can safely use her credit card online, here is brief summary of what’s going on behind the curtains.

Drinking The Koolixir – Part 1

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In case you haven’t yet heard of it yet, Elixir is a functional programming language (technically, a collection of macros) written in Erlang. I have been persuaded to add it to my (and, consequently, Grio’s) technical repertoire due to a good amount of recent buzz in the blogosphere (as well as some points I’ll get to later). To make sure I have a strong foundation for my Elixir learning experience, I am starting my adventure with a foray into the underlying syntax of Erlang.

Meteor

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For the past year, I’ve been working mainly with AngularJS and before that Ruby on Rails. I’ve never heard of Meteor until a few weeks ago. I am intrigued by the idea of tightly connecting the client and server together in a synergistic manner that allows for fast responsiveness, which is what Meteor is all about. I decided to go through Meteor’s tutorial online and get a feel for why the framework differentiates itself from other current technologies. From a very high level perspective, Meteor is a very good solution for quickly building an application from the ground up and provides some cool features out of the box.

Frontend Resolutions for 2015

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It is a new year and I can exploit that to write a post proclaiming how
something ought to be done in 2015. We can use the new year to discard last year’s practices and mistakes as “the old way” and start fresh from lessons that we’ve learned.

The interesting (and also most frustrating) part about building frontend apps is
how fast the landscape changes. The tools, libraries, and frameworks that you
use today might not be the same as what you’d end up using on a new project only
a month from now. While we’ve ended up with this culture of adopting something
new as soon as someone posts that the “old” way is “dead”, I’ve found a few
pieces of the frontend stack that I do not plan on switching out anytime soon.

I would also like to preface this with stating that this post is highly
opinionated. The opinions expressed here are mine and formed through my own
experiences. These opinions may not reflect what I end up doing in practice, nor
does it reflect on what others at Grio may choose or use.

Creating a Private CocoaPod

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On a recent project I was tasked with creating a private CocoaPod to be used by several internal iOS applications. As I did my research to do this, I found that the information was spread across several sites and not 100% clear (the CocoaPods site’s documentation could use some love in places). I am taking this opportunity to assist those that follow to create, organize, test and distribute a private Pod. I’ll also throw in a few tips for general pod development.