Objective-C…it’s not you…it’s Swift

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At the lastest Apple WWDC conference, Apple decided to suprise it’s developers with introducing a brand new language called Swift which will be used going forward in development all Mac and iOS applications. The good news for all Apple developers is that it is totally integratable with all existing Objective-C code. Another great positive for developers is that it also runs on the current version of iOS, iOS-7. Developers will still need to wait for Xcode-6 to come out of Beta before they can submit full Swift apps, but they will not require everyone to be running the latest iOS.

Who Will Win the World Cup? A Method to Predict the Future

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Several weeks ago I tried to predict who would win the World Cup. I faced this interesting problem I want to share: how can we relate the outcome of the World Cup with the strength of the teams? Let me explain it better: How can we account for the fact that some “lucky” teams play easier matches than others and thus most likely will arrive to a better stage?

When Will Software Developers Become Obsolete?

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Software development and software engineering are booming right now. Engineers are in high demand and commanding high wages. There are simply not enough software engineers available to fulfill the needs of companies looking to build applications and services.

While it seems demand for software developers will be strong for the foreseeable future, how long will it be before these engineers are replaced by the very software that they are tasked to create?

Writing Awesome CLI Tools in Ruby: Part I

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Introduction

I am always writing small tools to help me out on a daily basis. Sometimes shell scripts, but
other times I want something a bit more complex. When I need more than a simple shell script, I like to leverage ruby for its vast library of gems which can greatly accelerate and simplify the task of building these helpful tools.

This post will give an introduction to writing your own CLI tools in ruby and packaging them
as a gem.

Hiding Android’s System Bar

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For years developers (and consequently consumers), have had to accept the fact that the Tablets (and some phones) would always have the System/Navigation Bar visible on their screens. A 10.1 inch advertised screens, offered in fact a 9.8 inch usable screen.

Finally Google’s latest Android OS, KitKat, introduces a decent user-friendly tool that gives us ownership of that last bit of screen.